The Holy Trinity Church of England Secondary School

Pupil Premium Strategy

We are required to publish details of our Pupil Premium Grant Allocation, how we spend it and the impact it has on outcomes.

Pupil Premium - and Free School Meals Entitlement

Pupil Premium funding is a government grant aimed at supporting the engagement and progress of students that are perceived as coming from a more disadvantaged background. Students that qualify for Pupil Premium funding are those that have been on Free School Meals (FSM) at any point over the past 6 years, children who have been looked after continuously for at least 6 months (CLA), and children whose parents are in the armed forces.

For the year 2019/2020 the Pupil Premium had a value of £955 per eligible pupil. This is money given to the school even if your child doesn’t wish to have a school meal.  If you are not sure if your child qualifies for Free School Meals (FSM) please click on the link below and scroll to the bottom section of the page.

https://www.holytrinity.w-sussex.sch.uk/School-Meals/ 

Pupil premium strategy statement 

This statement details our school’s use of pupil premium (and recovery premium for the 2021 to 2022 academic year) funding to help improve the attainment of our disadvantaged pupils.  

It outlines our pupil premium strategy, how we intend to spend the funding in this academic year and the effect that last year’s spending of pupil premium had within our school.  

School overview 

Detail 

Data 

School name 

Holy Trinity C of E Secondary  

Number of pupils in school  

Years 7-11 – 1053 

Total - 1312 

Proportion (%) of pupil premium eligible pupils 

25.8 

Academic year/years that our current pupil premium strategy plan covers (3 year plans are recommended

Sept 2021 – August 2024 

Date this statement was published 

March 2021 

Date on which it will be reviewed 

March 2022 

Statement authorised by 

C.Millwood  

Headteacher 

Pupil premium lead 

K.Bramley 

Deputy Headteacher 

Governor / Trustee lead 

S.Sevier 

Link Governor 

 Funding overview 

Detail 

Amount 

Pupil premium funding allocation this academic year 

£258,805 

Recovery premium funding allocation this academic year 

£39,295 

Pupil premium funding carried forward from previous years (enter £0 if not applicable) 

£0 

Total budget for this academic year 

 

£298,100 

Part A: Pupil premium strategy plan 

Statement of intent 

Holy Trinity C of E School Pupil Premium Commitment: 

 

Know our students as individuals
Develop good behaviours for learning
Identify and remove barriers to learning
Promote academic excellence
Research suggests that the most effective way to close the achievement gap between Pupil Premium students and their peers is to have access to good quality teaching and learning. In addition to the support that happens in the classroom, there are several interventions and extra-curricular activities that the school provides, including:
Supporting Literacy and Numeracy skills with specialised tutors
Small group subject support, with specialist teachers, to focus on progress intervention in Math's and English
Small group revision and Homework support in a specialised Study Studio
Prioritised setting in core subjects
Some of the funding will be used to support those Pupil Premium students who have difficulty providing the equipment and experiences necessary to specific subject areas
The appointment of key staff including Pupil Premium coordinator led by a member of our Senior Leadership Team whose focus is to narrow the achievement gap of PP students
The appointment of dedicated Learning Support Assistant time, whose focus is to support the Pupil Premium Coordinators in tracking and intervening to support the academics and wellbeing of Pupil Premium students
Enabling wider participation:

 

Prioritised careers counselling and support
Prioritised student leadership opportunities
Cultural Capital days and KS3 passport

 

Personal well-being and attendance:  

 

Dedicated Learning Support Assistants to support emotional wellbeing
Student passports sharing Pupil Premium student voice with all staff, overseen by Learning Support Team 

Student referral system to triage intervention, updated in weekly meetings, maintained by dedicated administrator
High levels of attendance of Pupil Premium students maintained through proactive contact with families and assiduous relationship building from dedicated staff

Challenges

This details the key challenges to achievement that we have identified among our disadvantaged pupils. 

 

Challenge number 

Detail of challenge  

Disadvantaged students are making less progress   

Engagement levels of our disadvantaged students has been affected following school closure alongside this, school avoidance and anxiety has increased. SEMH levels are higher than national averages in the country and the level of disadvantage in the locality is great, with the economic effect of the pandemic on local employers such as Gatwick airport particularly effecting disadvantaged students. 

A significant number of disadvantaged students have lower literacy levels. In particular, the reading comprehension of these students is lower than non-disadvantaged peers impacting all subjects. 

A lack of aspiration and opportunities affects student engagement with careers and enrichment activities 

Attendance to school for PP is lower than Non-PP and Parental engagement to key events such as parents evening is lower for families of PP students in comparison to Non-PP. 

Access to equipment, technology, and the appropriate environment to learn at home. 

 

Intended outcomes  

This explains the outcomes we are aiming for by the end of our current strategy plan, and how we will measure whether they have been achieved. 

 

Intended outcome 

Success criteria linked to WSIP 

Ensure that ‘Quality First’ Teaching enables all students in all measures to achieve 

 

1.2

TEEP metacognition skills embedded within Quality First Teaching

Enable all students to access the curriculum and maximise their potential by improving school wide literacy levels 

 

1.3

action plan embedded
The place of Literacy in all subjects is understood and used to enable students to better access the curriculum.
Vocabulary gap is closed for PP students
Accelerated Reader shows improved engagement and STAR tests show improved reading scores, illustrating a more reading engaged cohort.
Bedrock relaunched to Year 7 and 8 students

Actively identify student and family barriers to learning and overcome these to secure student capacity to achieve their potential.   

 

2.1

Year Leaders analyse data and identify students who are not making expected progress and explore all avenues of pastoral support to identify barriers, find solutions and present findings to Executive SLT on a regular basis
Student Referral system, used by all staff to refer students not making expected progress against targets
Development of support afforded to families particularly through the implementation of Year Team LSAs allocated to all Year Groups to work with those who are not making expected progress
Study Studio available in for Year Group in the library
Intervention support in place for PP Students who also have EAL
Year 10/11 intervention (Cambridge/Phoenix) supported by specialist teachers
Implementation of BTEC Vocational Studies as an additional option at KS4
Tuition programmes launched for Maths and English.

 Students are provided with a broad enrichment and work-related offer that stimulates their aspirations as global citizens. 

 

3.1

New staff vacancy for a Work Experience & Careers administration Coordinator to support the careers leader.
Drop-down career or work-related activities for relevant year groups with an aim for at least one per year group delivered within the Cultural Capital Programme or school calendar year linked to curriculum [GBM4,5&6]
Work Experience planning finalised and partially implemented - Year 11 [GBM6]
All students in Years 7, 8 & 10 to have a record of their pathways progression with Unifrog through REACH [GBM3]
Targeted Gatsby benchmarks from 2021 COMPASS review improve

Student engagement in learning within the classroom is both aspirational and positive which provides all students the opportunity to achieve their potential. 

2.2

In house training in place for all HTS staff.
LSAs in class actively encouraging students in lessons.
Teachers actively engage students to participate in lessons working with LSAs to identify students to work alongside

Student Voice and Student Leadership directly influences the improvement of the school. 

3.2 

Student leadership working alongside the staff equality and diversity working party 
Effective Student Council structure in place and contributing to whole school life 

The school co-curricular provision enriches and maximises the curriculum that students access stimulating their aspirations as global citizens. 

3.4 

Termly Cultural Capital Days successfully delivered 
Planned inter-house competitions delivered throughout the curriculum and throughout the year 
A KS3 Passport is being established and has been launched with Year 7 with clear links interwoven into the curriculum and a prescribed set of experiences identified for graduation in Summer 2024 
Extra-curricular activities are running successfully outside of the normal school curriculum 
Student participation in cultural capital is not restricted to certain groups 

Chaplaincy: The school has developed a sustainable model of Chaplaincy that meets the spiritual needs of the community. 

 

4.2 

Chaplaincy links with families established 

 

Activity in this academic year 

This details how we intend to spend our pupil premium (and recovery premium funding) this academic year to address the challenges listed above.  

Teaching (for example, CPD, recruitment and retention) 

Budgeted cost: £ 80,000 

 

Activity 

Evidence that supports this approach 

Challenge number(s) addressed 

Ensure that ‘Quality First’ Teaching enables all students in all measures to achieve 

TEEP metacognition skills embedded within Quality First Teaching 

EEF metacognition and self regulation implementation plan in place to ensure practice is implemented embedded across curriculum 

1,3 

Enable all students to access the curriculum and maximise their potential by improving school wide literacy levels 

 

Improving literacy in all subject areas in line with recommendations in the EEF Guidance Improving Literacy in Secondary Schools 

1,3 

 

Targeted academic support (for example, tutoring, one-to-one support structured interventions)

  Budgeted cost: £ 132,000 

 

Activity 

Evidence that supports this approach 

Challenge number(s) addressed 

Actively identify student and family barriers to learning and overcome these to secure student capacity to achieve their potential.   

Enrolled with the National Tutoring Programme to provide tuition and school-led tutoring for students whose education has been most impacted by the pandemic.  

A range of in-house intervention groups to support literacy and numeracy as well as SEMH.

 

EEF guidance on one to one tuition 

EEF guidance small group tuition    

EEF guidance social and emotional learning 

EEF guidance Special Educational Needs in Mainstream Schools  

3,4,5 

Careers Pathways: Students are provided with a broad enrichment and work-related offer that stimulates their aspirations as global citizens. 

 

Statutory Careers guidance for schools 

 

Gatsby good career guidance 

5,6 

 

Wider strategies (for example, related to attendance, behaviour, wellbeing)

Budgeted cost: £46,805 

 

 

Activity 

Evidence that supports this approach 

Challenge number(s) addressed 

Student engagement in learning within the classroom is both aspirational and positive which provides all students the opportunity to achieve their potential. 

Our approach is the belief that good relationships are essential for outstanding education. 

Relational schools project 

 

The key to classroom management 

1,2,3,4,5,6 

Student Voice: Student Voice and Student Leadership directly influences the improvement of the school. 

EEF guidance Improving behaviour in schools 

4,5,6 

The school co-curricular provision enriches and maximises the curriculum that students access stimulating their aspirations as global citizens. 

EEF guidance - life-skills enrichment 

 

EEF guidance on physical activity 

4,5,6 

Chaplaincy: The school has developed a sustainable model of Chaplaincy that meets the spiritual needs of the community. 

CofE research in secondary school chaplaincy 

4,5,6 

 

 

Total budgeted cost: £ 258,805 

Part B: Review of outcomes in the previous academic year 

 

Pupil premium strategy outcomes 

This details the impact that our pupil premium activity had on pupils in the 2020 to 2021 academic year. 

 

Disadvantaged pupil performance overview for last academic year (Non Disadvantaged pupil performance in brackets) 

 

Attainment Target set for 2022 

2019 

2020 

2021 

Progress 8 

Achieve better than average progress made by disadvantaged pupils for similar schools (-0.5) 

 

-0.498 

N/A 

N/A 

Attainment 8 

Attainment 8 

Achieve national average attainment for disadvantaged pupils from similar schools at KS2   

 

30.64 

34.91 

(50.29) 

35.57 

(49.48) 

Percentage of Grade 5+ in English and maths 

Percentage of Grade 5+ in English and maths 

Achieve average English and maths 5+ scores for similar schools by prior attainment (low 2% middle 22% high 77%) 

 

13.2% 

16.7% 

(49.7%) 

22% 

(48.8%) 

Attendance 

Improve attendance for disadvantaged students to national average (94.5%) 

 

92.89% 

(96.37%) 

91.39% 

(96.14%) 

94.24% *  

73.37 

(92.37%) 

 

*  PP attendance data after adjustment of the coding, DFE coding changed for period of lockdown X7 Closed on PHE advice, C authorised absence for vulnerable students reflected actual attendance of disadvantaged students 

 

Teaching priorities for academic year 20/21 

 

Measure 

Activity 

Review from Whole School COVID Recovery Plan Key Performance Indicators 

Priority 1: Metacognition Program 

 

 

Priority 2: Differentiation 

 

Development of a whole school metacognition program that will help to enable knowledge acquisition. 

 

High quality differentiation to enable all students to successfully access the curriculum 

 

Senior Leaders attended online meetings with SSAT about TEEP 2.0.  

 

All staff trained on the new Underpinning Elements during March inset. All new staff will received Day 1 of TEEP 2.0 on Friday 3rd Sept. TEEP 2 Inset Day delivered to whole staff completed with all resources available to staff .TEEP 2 Learning & Teaching displays in all classrooms 

  

 

 

 

 

Priority 3: Ready to learn skills 

Development of whole school Study Studio and breakfast club that will enable students to be ready to learn 

Study Studio running after school in every zone staffed by LSAs 

Every PP family invited to PP appointments at Online Parent Evenings 

All PP families contacted by pastoral team to improve attendance to Parents Evening and Study Studio 

 

 

Priority 4: Reading and Vocabulary development 

Reading and Vocabulary to be prioritised across the curriculum and where needed intervention to be put in place 

Interventions in place – eg Nessy 

Priority 5: Behaviour 

Implementation of a behaviour management system that is applied consistently by all staff which focusses on praise in public and sanction in private 

Pivotal Behaviour Management methodology implemented for September 2020  

With training to all existing staff (15 hours online) and new staff who joined the school during the academic year as part of the new staff induction processes.  

Ready, Respectful, Safe screensavers placed on all computers 

Restorative questions sheets placed in every classroom and all colleagues expected to follow this script whilst performing restorative conversations. If required, members of the behaviour and pastoral teams have been on hand to coach colleagues whilst conducting restorative conversations. Staff training was delivered by colleagues to all student facing adults, with a slightly amended script. 

Staff survey suggests that 86% of teachers were utilising the praise board in their classroom during the period of time when we had peripatetic teaching in year group zones. 

A total of 11,388 praise awards were issued through subjects during the academic year. This equates to around 1898 awards being issued each half term, which averages out at each student receiving 1.5 awards per half term. Some staff issued more than others so consistency is an issue. 

A total of 3064 praise awards were given by form tutors. The expectation was reduced from 10 per week to 5, in line with staff voice.  

3064 averages out at 15 praise awards per tutor group, per half term.  

 

Barriers to learning these priorities address 

Low levels of engagement with curriculum  

Ability to engage remotely 

 

Projected spending  

£70,000 

 

 

Targeted academic support for current academic year:

 

Measure 

Activity 

Review 

Priority 1: Setting 

To ensure all disadvantaged students make good progress  

All disadvantaged students are accurately analysed for potential and positively discriminated when set provision is planned in core subjects.  

 

New system in place for September 2020 

Priority 2: Literacy 

Development of a whole school literacy program including targeted intervention 

After the long term absence of the literacy lead this is now led by the SENDCO. 

Priority 3: Numeracy 

Development of a whole school numeracy program including targeted intervention 

Numeracy Ninja supplied to Tutor groups 

Additional Maths teachers in Years 7-9 creating a new class to target students with gaps in their learning 

Maths Wiz delivered to intervention groups by specialist teacher. 

In a dedicated and upgraded computer suite allowing 15 students a session. 

 

Priority 4: SEMH 

Ensure disadvantaged students have access to high quality inclusion, pastoral and mental health support to enable them to succeed academically  

Referral system in place to triage range of in house provision and support 

65 PP students received intervention support with an average outcome as expected  

Barriers to learning these priorities address 

Low levels of literacy and numeracy 

 

SEND students enabled to access the curriculum at an appropriate level to meet their needs and stage of development. 

 

Language and Communication prioritised through vocabulary development to address the levels of SEND and EAL students as well as recognising this as a key skill for all students. 

 

Over the course of the year 60 students have received targeted literacy support and 78 students have received targeted numeracy support 

 

 

Projected spending 

£135,000 

 

 

Non-DfE programmes purchased in the previous academic year.  

Programme 

Provider 

Solution focus mentoring 

Kick London